WOMEN WRITERS LET THEIR HAIR DOWN

The first three out-of-print volumes of the international anthology in a single paperback — featuring 32 extraordinary women writers revealing their most intimate stories. This omnibus edition is feminist fiction at its most provocative — guaranteed to unsettle, excite, transport, and arouse readers.

FEATURING: Jessica Alexander, Tamara Faith Berger, Elizabeth Bolton, Emily June Brink, Suzanne Burns, Tina V. Cabrera, Catherine D’Avis, Emma Gibb, Petra Anne Hawk, Elna Holst, Eurydice Kamvyselli, Rachel Kendall, Marina Kris, Cody Kmoch, Lily Knol, Marina Kris, Mandy Lee, Karen Moller, Pamela Naruta, L T O’Rourke, Erin Pim, Val Prozorova, Marina Rubin, Maria Schurr, Aurora Seymour, Sophia Smith, Star Spider, Amy Summers, Tara Stillions Whitehead, L C Wilkinson, Rebecca Woolston, Elizabeth Yoo.

NEW URGE READER OMNIBUS
Edited by N. Conquest, Petra Anne Hawk, Elizabeth Yoo
Second Edition
350 pp., 5.06 x 7.81 inches; paper; $19.95
978-1733165679

ORDER NOW AND GET THIS SUPER DISCOUNT — 79% OFF THE COVER PRICE

RIDE THE WAVE

Crimes are a dime a dozen these days, but inside the “crime wave” issue of BLACK SCAT REVIEW you’ll find the high ones, the low ones, the in-betweens—true  crimes, faux felonies, misdemeanors, murders, robberies, rapes, and speculative villainy.

Something illegal for everyone. 

Featuring an international roster of criminally-minded artists & writers: Tim Newton Anderson; Tom Barrett;  Margot Block; Norman Conquest; Charles Cros; Robert James Cross; Farewell Debut;  Debra Di Blasi; Fernando Fidanza; Larry Fondation; Peter Gambaccini; Eckhard Gerdes; Émile Goudeau; Rhys Hughes; Harold Jaffe; Amy Kurman; Michael Leigh; Martha McCollough; Jim McMenamin; Derek Pell; Michael Pollentine; Frank Pulaski; Paul Rosheim; Doug Skinner; Saira Viola; and Tom Whalen.  

So dive right in and ride the wave.

SOMETHING TO CROS ABOUT!

CHARLES CROS: COLLECTED MONOLOGUES

It’s back to cool with the great French monologist,  humorist, poet, and inventor—in a trenchant translation by Doug Skinner.

***FIRST PUBLICATION IN ENGLISH!***

Born in1842, Charles Cros was one of the most brilliant minds of his generation, equally adept at poetry, fiction, and scientific inquiry. He wrote smutty verses with Verlaine, synthesized gems with Alphonse Allais, contributed wild prose fantasies to Le Chat Noir, and experimented with color photography and sound recording, only to die young, poor, and alcoholic. Not incidentally, he also invented the comic monologue for the actor Coquelin Cadet. In these strikingly spontaneous and modern sketches, he introduces a gallery of fools and obsessives—The Clean Man, The Fencing Master, The Capitalist, The Friend of the Family—all nattering away, assaulting the audience with trivia, and blithely unaware of their own failings.

This edition collects all 22 of Cros’s monologues—masterfully translated & introduced by Doug Skinner—and includes performance notes by Coquelin, plus two biographical essays by his friend and colleague Alphonse Allais.

“The sheer playfulness of certain fanciful parts of Cros’s work must not let us forget that in the center of some of his finest poems, a revolver is aimed at us.”—André Breton


ALSO AVAILABLE

Charles Cros and Émile Goudeau were quintessential Bohemian poets of the 1880s. Cros also experimented with the phonograph and color photography; Goudeau founded the Hydropathes, who met to declaim poetry while not drinking water. Cros and Goudeau’s only collaboration was a series of five exuberant stories published in 1880, which satirized such hot topics as divorce and capital punishment with bawdy humor and wild flights of fancy. All five stories are included here, plus four solo stories by Cros that complete the series, translated and annotated by Doug Skinner.

“Amiable smuttiness.” —Émile Zola

TURDS IN PROGRESS

I have been working my arse off (pardon the expression) designing an expanded edition of Merde à La Belle Époque, translated by the venerable Doug Skinner, and featuring scatological works by Alphonse Allais, George Auriol, Léon Bloy, Georges Courteline, Charles Cros, J. Eschbach, Edmond Haraucourt, Vincent Hyspa, Alfred Jarry, Jules Jouy, Maurice Mac-Nab, Armand Masson, Arthur Rimbaud, Rodolphe Salis, Erik Satie, Henry Somm, & Émile Zola.

Black Scat’s original edition was published in 2014 as volume 24 in the Absurdist Texts & Documents series — a little 48-paged (spineless) chapbook, limited to only 310 copies. 

At the time, we hailed it as our “#2 Bestseller,” assuming it would remain the last turd on the subject. But nonot by a long shot! Indeed, more gems lay hidden below the surface, just waiting to be fished out of the tank by the skilled hands of Monsieur Skinner.

One of many of our new edition’s highlights is Le Journal des Merdeux (The Little Shits’ Journal)—text by Jules Jouy & cartoons by J. Eschbach. This sublime, single-sided broadside surfaced in 1882 and was immediately banned by the French censors. Alas, one can only imagine what precious merde might have been excreted had subsequent issues appeared. 😢

This very rare Merdeux has never been translated, so it is fitting Black Scat should be the one to uncork it. (Here, take a sniff.) The translation itself involves arduous work—especially when bringing French puns to life with equivalent wordplay in English. One example from the Journal: there’s a joke about pilgrims going to Lourdes, because it’s good luck to step in “la grotte” (a pun for “la crotte”). Skinner made it good luck to step in dogma, keeping both the scatological superstition and the anti-clericalism. A rather brilliant twist.  

Meanwhile, capturing the essence—if not the aroma—of the broadside’s design was a Herculean task. It required many days & nights of painstaking efforts in the WC, matching typography, kerning, cursing (“merde!”), and cleaning up all 28 illustrations which, as you can see from the reproduction below, were stained & degraded by the ravages of time. 

One of J. Eschbach’s drawings seemed ideal for the cover of the forthcoming edition. 

In the book, the single-sheet Little Shits’ Journal runs 9-pages with two columns each. Of course we’d have to hire an extraterrestrial sorcerer to fit the broadside’s 6-columns onto a page only 5.06 inches wide.

The bottom line: working on MERDE was a dirty job, but we were born to doo it.

We hope you’ll consider adding the expanded edition to your collection as soon as it, uh, comes out.

Norman Conquest