Ceci n’est pas Magritte

Move over Mona Lisa, the subject of René Magritte’s classic painting Le fils de l’homme (1964) has been transformed into an iconic  Everyman — forced to confront the forces of contemporary life.

Portuguese artist Paulo Brito reanimates the  mysterious figure in a series of satirical  collages you won’t soon forget.

The future of Dada is here!

SONS OF MAN
by Paulo Brito
with a preface by mercie pedro e silva
Absurdist Texts & Documents No. 33
Illustrated, full color; perfect-bound; $15
$5 digital edition

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THE IDIOT GETS A RAVE

“Every time I write about Doug Skinner’s translations of Alphonse Allais – the new one is I Am Sarcey  – I say that Allais’s humor columns and so on ought to be period pieces, historical ephemera, but are better than that, are good.  Still funny; still fun.  This is my only idea about Allais, apparently.  If anything this is even more the case with I Am Sarcey – more ephemeral yet not, but even more so.’

Wuthering Expectations

CLICK HERE to read the complete review.

And then CLICK HERE and enjoy the book for yourself.

The Sporting Life!

This collection of sporting tales mashes literary history and sports lore into a satirical inferno—skewering academic jargon and postmodern analysis with a razor-sharp, poison-tipped foil. Axelrod mischievously injects the ancients with steroids and offers statistics to prove how little we know about the origin of our favorite pastimes. Inside you’ll discover the “Baudelaire-Bird Connection or, How the Boston Celtics Got To Be That Way”; the obscure “Russian Sport of Face Slapping”; “Metaleptic Parabasis or, the Fine Art of High Jumping”; “Jai-Alai Machu Picchu,” and many other strange feats of Physical Lit-ness. Arm yourself with these tales and head to the nearest sports bar or poetry reading and laugh your ass off.

Dante’s Foil & Other Sporting Tales
by mark axelrod

150 pp., trade paperback, $12.95

AVAILABLE ON AMAZON

Sarcey and His Muse

Black Scat author and translator Doug Skinner recently informed us about a book of poems he’s reading  by Raoul Ponchon. One  poem in particular struck his fancy as it’s  about the conservative French drama critic  Francisque Sarcey (1827-1899).  The poem — “Our Uncle’s Aunt” — mocks Sarcey,  saying his reviews were influenced by his elderly aunt. Lucien Boucher‘s illustration .is reproduced here.

Sarcey was the frequent  butt of jokes  by artists and writers  in the pages of the bohemian journal Le Chat Noir. But it was  the brilliant humorist Alphonse Allais who took the mockery to  extremes  and single-handedly transformed the critic into an Ubuesque piñata in a series of columns published under Sarcey’s name. This sustained journalistic prank has been  preserved in  I AM SARCEY by Alphonse Allais — compiled and translated by Doug Skinner.

 

This is one of the funniest books we’ve ever published — and that’s saying a lot. If you’re looking for a hilarious example of black humor, don’t miss it.

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